Emily Steinbarth

Emily Steinbarth

Lead Quantitative Research Analyst

Masters in Financial Engineering, UCLA-Anderson School of Management, 2015
M.A. Economics, University of California-Los Angeles, 2014
B.A. Economics, Claremont McKenna College, 2009


Emily Steinbarth is a lead quantitative research analyst at Russell Investments focusing on the research and development of the firm’s Direct Investment equity strategies. In this role, Emily is involved in the continual development of global quantitative equity portfolios with a focus on ESG and decarbonization strategies. Most recently, these projects have involved leading the research to convert Russell Investments’ existing low carbon strategies to an enhancement, Decarbonization 2.0, as well as building proprietary company-level ESG scores. Emily is a member of the ESG Knowledge Specialists (EKS) team at Russell Investments.

Emily joined Russell Investments in January 2016. Prior to her current role, she worked as a research analyst for a cross-asset systematic hedge fund where she was part of the team developing quantitative trading strategies. In addition to this role she has worked on the Quantitative Risk Management team for a macro hedge fund advisor. Prior to joining Russell Investments, Emily was located in Los Angeles where she completed her Masters in Financial Engineering and Masters in Economics at UCLA.

Published works include:


Materiality Matters: Executive summary

February 2022
How Russell Investments has developed a way to measure a company's ESG score and the Material Score evaluates only those issues that are financially important to a company.

White paper: SMA design in the presence of taxes

June 2021
This white paper explores the tax management of separately managed accounts (SMAs) by looking at: (1) real active managers' portfolios; and (2) using an SMA-style investment vehicle rather than a mutual fund.

Moving the climate focus beyond carbon and on to water

June 2019
The impact of water-related risks on communities is potentially catastrophic, given water’s place as a critical input to all facets of life. It is this that makes risks related to water multi-dimensional. Furthermore, not only do we need to know how much water is used (i.e. volume), but we also need to plot that against where the unit of water is used (location).

Decarbonization 2.0

June 2019
Enhancing our original decarbonization strategy with three additional sustainable investing insights, as these continue to develop and evolve.